THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE KERN RIVER PARKWAY FOUNDATION

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KERN RIVER PARKWAY FOUNDATION  A non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization

The KRPF is a non-profit foundation that works to protect, preserve, and restore the natural riparian and wildlife habitat of the Kern River.

The KERN RIVER PLAN of 1985 is the guiding document for the Kern River Parkway;  a pdf of this document is online.




The Kern River Parkway Foundation has received a $1000 grant from Wells Fargo through its Community Partners program.  Thank you, Wells Fargo.

        Wells Fargo is proud to support organizations working to strengthen our communities. Through the efforts of our enthusiastic team member-volunteers and our contributions, we share our success within our communities by giving back to non-profits and educational institutions that address vital community needs and issues.

We direct our giving to areas that we believe are important to the future of our nation's vitality and success: community development, education, and human services.

Marina Lopez presenting check     
Kern River Parkway Foundation President Bill Cooper and Wells Fargo Branch
Manager Marina Lopez.  

Bill Cooper, Marina Lopez, and Rich O'Neil



REPORT: PARKWAY FOUNDATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2011-12

FRIENDS OF THE KERN RIVER PARKWAY,   the years of 2011 and 2012 were full of accomplishments;  this is what the Foundation did with your support:

1.  Worked on the restoration of the historic Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) adobe (now named Peacock House) at Hart Park. 7. Assisted in planning and dedicating the new Uplands of the Kern River Parkway nature area, permanent wetland and educational kiosks. This totals 8 acres and over 300 native trees and shrubs.
 2. Mentored 3 Eagle Scout candidates involved in conservation/ environmental projects along the Kern River Parkway. 8. Successfully directed the route of the Westside Freeway away from environmentally sensitive areas of Truxtun Lake and Riparian Parkland. Caltrans is now opting for the environmentally preferable Route B rather than Route A or Route C.
3. Raised, planted and maintained native trees in the Panorama Vista Preserve,  including nursery watering, maintaining equipment, repairing the irrigation system, repotting trees and shrubs, weeding, and mulching . 9. Continued to fight for the “rewatering” of the lower Kern River. This is an ongoing effort to restore a year round minimum flow.
4. Continued to negotiate and plan for the restoration of 340 trees along the Parkway and by the new Mohawk/ Kern River Bridge . 10. Planned and assisted in the initial planting of California native trees and shrubs in new landscaping and hardscaping along with replacing non-California natives.
5. Involved in the completion of the Kern County Master Bike Trail Plan which includes the 32 mile long Parkway. 11. Worked to place a “Welcome to the Kern River” sign at the intersection of the Kern River and the 24th St. Bridge Improvement Project.

6. Worked on coordinating the Kern County Bike Plan with the new City of Bakersfield Bike Plan which includes the Parkway. This plan would extend the Parkway out to Lake Buena Vista and the Tule Elk Preserve, an additional 5 miles.


These efforts have been made possible in part by your donations of money or in kind labor.  
No Kern River Parkway Foundation member receives any payment and all money donated to the Foundation goes toward preserving, protecting and enhancing the native riparian habitat of the Kern River Parkway along with improving river trails, staging areas, signage, and educational opportunities.
Thank you to all who have supported the Foundation in the past year.





DID YOU KNOW THAT...


... The Kern River Parkway has one of the most extensive bike trails (32 miles)  in the state, but it ALSO includes:

9  Bakersfield City parks:
»  Beach Park
» Yokuts Park
»  Park at River Walk
» River Oaks Park
» Aera Park
» Truxtun Lake Park
» Kern River Uplands Park
» San Miguel Grove
» Upland Park
4  Kern County parks/park complexes:
» Buena Vista Aquatic Recreation Area 
» Panorama Park on top of the Bluffs
» Metro Recreational Center (Sam Lynn Baseball Park,  Little League Baseball field,  Stramler Park)
» Kern River County Park Complex  (Hart Park, Soccer Park, CALM, Kern River Golf Course and Lake Ming)

and Riverview Park in the North of the River Recreation and Park District  (Oildale)




PLUS


A  horse trail, also 32 miles long, and the Hoey Jogging (1/1/2 miles from Yokuts Park around Truxtun Lake) are also park of the Parkway system, as is the Panorama Vista Preserve, located below the Panorama Bluffs, on both sides of the Kern River, which also includes numerous horse trails.


The Water Recharge/Wildlife Natural Area west of town is part of the Parkway.

Over all, the Parkway encompasses 1400 acres of wetland preserves and natural riparian areas for a total of 6,000 acres of public space.

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"It is important to remember that the Parkway consists not only of natural habitat and primary floodplain, but also areas of secondary floodplain, river buffer zones, groomed or loosely-groomed parks, and paved/unpaved trails.  There are also several hundred acres of areas outside of the floodways, such as River Walk, shopping, the Kern County Museum, restaurants, recharge zones, baseball fields and soccer fields. All of the above lie within the Parkway Plan and Corridor and should be planted with appropriate California Native plants. "  --  Rich Oneil, Charter member and Co-founder  of the Kern River Parkway Foundation.


Mailing Address:  Kern River Parkway Foundation,   P.O. Box 1602, Bakersfield, CA  93302

Reveg wi native trees

REVEGETATING WITH NATIVE TREES
(Panorama Vista Preserve)


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11/22//13



FISHING AT HART PARK

Coyote
COYOTE

Soccer park
SOCCER PARK EAST OF HART PARK

On
                        the Bike Path
ON THE BIKE PATH

Egret
WHITE EGRET